Mary Beth Writes

Len and I went to the March for our Lives in Milwaukee today.

Here are of our observations and thoughts.

First: There were as many not-young people as young ones. It was the most age-diverse protest/march I have ever attended and that felt good. This is a young person’s movement right now, and that's awesome – but the reality when one is there feels far less “youth vs old people” than the media makes this out to be. People young and old and in-between want our laws to reflect the common sense of the majority of American citizens.

Meaning: Get rid of assault weapons. Institute an assault weapon buy-back. Close the damn loopholes. This is not hard.

Do Not let the NRA run our Second Amendment conversation to their own profits. Citizens don't need war weapons. there were plenty of hunters and veterans in the march today. 

This caught my attention. The young people who spoke were GOOD! They were clear, cogent, impassioned, and inspiring. I have been to many protests/marches in my life and usually (sorry to confess this now) one just wanders away after one walks with the crowd. But not this time.

The kids talked FIRST and they were gripping speakers. How did these kids pull this off so well?

The young woman speaker from Union Grove made people clap and laugh with this: “I and some others planned the walkout at Union Grove High School. Someone asked me ahead of time how many I thought would be there. I said to myself, well, there’s me, I have five friends and they each have a friend – so many 10? 

"170 students walked out that day.”

The crowd cheered.

Then: “So then I heard they were accepting videos from kids to consider who could speak here today, I made a video and sent it in. You know how grown-ups sort of roll their eyes and say, yes, that’s nice?” Well, here I am!”

Friends, look at that.  These kids used their smart phones to audition to speak. The organizing kids considered the videos, and got the sense of a person’s passion and abilities. 

This time the speakers were not famous or “entitled by previous leadership”. These young people used the tools they all have in their pockets. 

This is how the internet and smart phones and social media CAN be used.  This levels the field away from privilege and towards skill, ability, and talent. 

Next observation: When you are marching in a traffic tunnel– cheers and chants are VERY loud. That was the best use of an underpass ever...

Finally: It was cold out there! The wind was directly off the lake; wind-chill was 20-25 degrees. I’m not really warm yet.

 

Here are a few of the photos Len and I took.

3/24/2018 Milwaukee

3/24/2018 Milwaukee

3/24/2018 Milwaukee

3/24/2018 Milwaukee

3/24/2018 Milwaukee

3/24/2018 Milwaukee

3/24/2018 Milwaukee

Comments

Awesome!

The nation is listening to, and motivated by, her leaders.... the youth!

I was happy to read your reflections. Hopeful!

You can either fight the future or walk with it

Thanks for sharing your experience! This movement gives me some hope for the future.

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Read this, Friends. "Home" by Warsan Shire

I just read this poem. The small part I can do today is pass it along to you.

https://genius.com/Warsan-shire-home-annotated

Home by Warsan Shire

(Shire was born in Kenya to Somali parents. She migrated with her family, as a child, to Great Britain.)

 

Home

no one leaves home unless
home is the mouth of a shark.

you only run for the border
when you see the whole city
running as well.

To Never Return - “No Great Mischief” by Alistair MacLeod

I read a remarkable book that I think some of you might like to read, also.

It’s “No Great Mischief” by Alistair MacLeod (1936-2014) and it is considered one of the Canada’s finest novels.  

The book is set in the 1980’s; Alexander MacDonald is the narrator. Curiously there will be three Alexander MacDonalds in this novel; each lives out a particular destiny of immigrants to North America, each moves the modern story ahead.

Our Un-rocky 4000 Mile Road Trip to the Rockies

I am very happy to have this website back! So is Len ... now he can go go on to OTHER projects on his list.  Fixing this after the attack-hack of early May - it was not an easy thing. 

But we're good to go now ...

While I was offline I was one a big old road trip to the Canadian Rockies. And then I was writing about it.

Some of you remember the Prairie Dog Quadrilateral - my weekly newsletter. I published it in PDF mode because it allows me to add a lot of photos.

(Don't) Send in the Clowns

Where this blog-post started: Several posts ago “The Non-Consumer Advocate” was about clowns. Specifically, the weird clown flotsam one finds when thrifting.  Here’s what Katy Wolk-Stanley posted at her site. http://thenonconsumeradvocate.com/goodwill-badwill-questionable-will-clowns-clowns-more-clowns/  

That Thing You Found or Made

Last week I went thrift shopping with my friend Franc. We saw this mobile made from dried paint brushes.  It’s hanging from the ceiling in the Habitat for Humanity reStore in Wauwatosa. 

I appreciate eclectic things made by real humans – as opposed to all the cool, anonymous stuff straight from a design team in some random place you’ve never heard of, that comes in an appropriately designed box, and it looks just like everything else. 

What is an object in your life that you love, that you would like to take with you to your last apartment and beyond?

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