Mary Beth Writes

This is a small compendium of photos and observations from a quick trip we took to Detroit last weekend.  

Amazingly, this has taken ALL my time since Wednesday morning. Sheesh, one seldom really sees Giant New Things to Learn as they come down the pike straight at one. 

These photos are from my phone, Len's phone, and our camera. So I got to play with two on-line albums of photos and then, surprise-surprise, the end product was "too big" - so today I got to run all the photos through Photoshop to make them smaller pixel-wise.  

So after a very cool weekend seeing and learning new things I got to come home and do it for three more days. 

Have a good weekend.

Tags

Comments

I am amazed at how much you can pack into such a short time.

So were we!... Belle Isle was unique - all those places to explore and things to do in one general area. We parked in one place to see the Aquarium, Conservatory, and Maritime Museum. We drove and parked again for the Art Fair. Driving to the Detroit Institute of Art took about 15 minutes from Belle Isle. The highways made no sense to us - not our city - but at the same time Google Maps (the directions lady..) told us what to do - and because the city's population is half what it was 30-40 years ago - traffic didn't slow or snag. Big city amenities with mid-sized city driving.

Thanks for that photo essay on Detroit. Carol C. took me there many years so I could see where she came from. We did many of those same things and it was fun to revisit them. Yup, I'm sure that woodchuck's dad was from Escanaba.....

My mom's sis and family lived in Detroit, one of my cousins still lives near there. We visited quite a few times when I was young and I remember the vibrant city it was in the 1950s. I also remember Belle Isle which was to me a magic place. I was last in Detroit in 1974 when I was traveling for work -- it was already in decline and yet the local woman with whom I was working took me to some interesting places. I especially remember a jazz club where we saw a well known musician perform. I am glad to hear that there are some encouraging things happening there - and that Belle Isle is still a neat place.

You already mentioned this, but here’s a recent post: https://www.freep.com/story/money/business/2018/08/15/michigan-central-station-corktown-cost-740-million/994867002/

We had a woodchuck living under our fence. Surprisingly big creatures!

Add new comment

CAPTCHA

This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

#UTLAStrong!

My niece Susan is a speech therapist educator in the Los Angeles public schools. She is on strike and I am proud to be in her family. Teachers are the foundation of everything else we all do. For most of the skills most of us depend on to live our lives - If no one teaches you, you don’t know.   

Some Unrelated Observations 12/31/18

I'm working on some big projects lately, so here are some small thoughts along the way. 

...

Mansfield Park is Jane Austen’s weirdest novel. Jane-Readers love Jane because her best characters are bright women stuck in situations too small for them. Their observations are bitingly perceptive; you see their inner spirit and you identify, identify, identify.

I’m amazed at critics who think that those of us who love Jane Austen are not-quite-evolved humans; how can we love a book about a girl in a big dress catching her man?

A Small, True Christmas Eve Story

Christmas Eve is when we remember that we are capable of wonder and astonishment. It is a day for unexpected light and warmth, for animals who speak, and for people who thought no one was looking - becoming the center of a love story.

Four Days Up North

If you click into the icon that's right here, you can read my take on our recent small vacation to northern Wisconsin. We hiked - and took photos!  Pictures are by both of us, though a lot of the most astounding ones are from Len and his 10-year old Nikon. 

Missionary Types in the Mississippi Watershed in the 1600’s. Oh yeah.

Happy All Saints Day.

Today (though it will probably be yesterday by the time I get this written) we are going to discuss Catholic missionary types who proselytized Mississippi watershed country in the mid-to-late 1600’s.

Nomadland. How people live well enough when there is no way to live well.

Nomadland: Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century - by Jessica Bruder

 

You’ve read these kinds of statistics before.  In the US our incomes are spread like this: The top 1% suck up 81 times MORE annual income than the bottom half of ALL Americans.

Ad Promotion